THE LAST WILL & TESTAMENT OF STEPHEN WALKER

March 2, 1857


In the name of God Amen, I Stephen Walker of the County of Lincoln and State of Tennessee do make and declare this my last Will and Testament in manner and form as follows Viz:


First I resign my soul unto the hands of Almighty God hoping and believing in a remission of my sins through the merits & mediation of Jesus Christ and my body I commit to the earth to be buried at the discretion of my excutors herein after named. And my worldy estate I give and desire to be disposed of as follows:


1st I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Elizabeth C. Walker all my estate both real & personal during her natural life & widowhood. 2nd At the death of my wife Elizabeth C. Walker, I give to my daughter Martha A. Hambrick fifty dollars. 3rd I give to my daughter Mary J. Phillips & children the tract of land on which she & her husband are now living and one hundred dollars out of the sale of the boy Richmond after the death of my wife. 4th I give Wm. A. Walker fifty dollars provided he returns a note of hand to me or my executors executed by me to said Wm A. Walker for an animal of his of the horse kind some nine or more years ago to keep it from being sold for his debts. The note is for thirty five dollars and the only one that said Wm A. Walker holds against me. If the said Wm. A. Walker returns said note either to to me or executors then said Wm. A. Walker will be intitled fifty dollars out of my estate provided there are effects enough to give to each one of my heirs that amount. 5th I give to my son Peter T. Walker fifty dollars out of the one hundred dollars of security money that I paid for him and the remaining fifty dollars said Peter T. Walker will pay to me or my executors. 6 I give to Elizabeth Nance's children fifty dollars. If there should not be property enough at the death of my wife to give fifty dollars to each one as I have directed then in that case each one whom I have named shall share in proportion to the amount of perishable property that may be on the place at the death of my wife. 7th I give to my 2 youngest daughters Nancy Willborn & Lucy Walker at the death of my wife the Negro Boy named Richmond, said boy I direct to be sold & one hundred dollars of the proceeds to be given to Mary J. Phillips & the balance equally divided between Nancy Willborn & Lucy Walker. But if in case either of the two last named daughters should die before a distribution of the proceeds of the boy should be made in that case the surviving one shall inherit the legacy of the other. But if in case both of said daughters should die before the division is made then in that case the proceeds of said boy shall be equally divided among all my lawfull heirs in addition to whom I have directed should have fifty dollars. But if in case the said boy should die before a distribution is made then in that case thouse daughters to whom said boy is willed shall recieve an equal portion out of my estate with the rest of the legatees. 8th I give to my son Stephen T. Walker the tract of land that I now live on at the death of his mother. And I give him from this time all that he can make on said premises over a support during mine & his mother's lifetime provided he takes care of me & his mother & sister that is with us & does not bring my estate in debt any further than is really necessary for a support. 9th I further direct that Lucy Walker shall have when she marries as much furniture & stock as my other children have received at their marriages. 10th I appoint Stephen T. Walker Executor & Elizabeth C. Walker Executress to carry out the provisions of this my last will and testament signed sealed and published this 3rd day Dec in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred & fifty three in presants (sic) of us,


(signed)
Wm Ashworth
Henry Henderson
(illegible name)
(signed)
Stephen Walker

Proven in open court
the 2nd March 1857
Eli (illegible last name), clerk


Submitted by: Suzanne Hallstrom -- fabercove@aol.com

 

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